Supreme Court Advisory Committee on Access and Fairness

Supreme Court Advisory Committee on Access and Fairness

RJH Justice Complex , 25 W. Market St., PO Box 037, Trenton, NJ 08625-0037
Judge Glenn A. Grant, Chair
Janie Rodriguez, staff

About the Supreme Court Advisory Committee on Access and Fairness

To ensure that the Judiciary, as an institution, embraces access and fairness as an integral part of its core values, Chief Justice Stuart Rabner created the Supreme Court Advisory Committee on Access and Fairness. The work of the committee will help to set the tone for the operation of the Judiciary for the next quarter century and beyond.

The committee is comprised of judges, judiciary staff and members of various public organizations. Membership is diverse, with talent from the bench, vicinage management, central office leadership, and others such as bar associations, Legal Services of New Jersey and Sheriffs' Association of New Jersey.

The committee is creating a statewide campaign to focus on how to administer justice in the face of such challenges as the continued increase in the number of self-represented litigants, the economic pressures applied to litigants and to the courts, and the need to treat each case and each litigant with dignity and respect.

Why is this important?

The millions of litigants who come to the courts each year for a just resolution of their cases must believe they are being treated fairly, with or without counsel. They must have full access to the courts, regardless of income, language barriers, disability, cultural diversity, or educational level.
The Judiciary is guided by its four core values: independence, integrity, fairness and quality service. Access and fairness are the foundation of those values and shape the experience of every litigant. Fairness cannot be attained without access to the courts, the most important component of quality service.

|Top of Page|

Without question, the New Jersey Judiciary has accomplished a great deal to incorporate its core values into its everyday work. The Judiciary has created a coordinated and integrated approach to problem solving through conferences, committees, expanded training, and communication with staff and the public. But as the Judiciary moves forward, it must place new and greater emphasis on access to the courts and fairness in its procedures.
Some of the Judiciary's successes include:

Through the leadership of New Jersey Chief Justice Stuart Rabner, all three branches of state government worked together to reform the criminal justice system, which required a constitutional amendment, the enactment of the bail/speedy trial reform law, and revisions to the rules of court. New Jersey has now moved from a system that relied principally on setting monetary bail as a condition of release to a risk-based system that is more objective, and thus fairer to defendants because it is unrelated to their ability to pay monetary bail. A risk-based system promotes the safety of the community, and also considers whether the defendant will appear for future court appearances and whether the defendant is likely to obstruct the criminal justice process.
The NJMC app allows users to pay traffic tickets online through NJMCdirect, search for information about the state’s municipal courts, and access the publication “Your Day in Municipal Court,” which answers the most-asked questions about how a typical municipal court case proceeds.
The NJAttorney app links to information attorneys use most frequently, including Notices to the Bar, directions and contact information for courthouses, court rules and rules of evidence.
The NJJuror app offers jurors convenient access to information about their jury service, including directions, parking information, call-off messages and announcements, and contact information for local jury managers. A list of frequently asked questions and a link to the “You, the Juror” introductory video that all jurors watch at the beginning of their jury service also are available.
New Jersey Chief Justice Stuart Rabner established the Supreme Court Advisory Committee on Access and Fairness ("the Committee") to guide the judiciary in adapting to current and future demands on the courts. The committee focus is on how to best administer justice in the face of challenges such as the continued increase in the number of self-represented litigants, the growing multicultural population in New Jersey, the need for expanded language services, the economic pressures on litigants and the courts, and the need to ensure quality service and to treat each case and each litigant with dignity and respect.
The Advisory Group on Self-Representation in the New Jersey Courts (Advisory Group) was established to assess successful programs, policies, and procedures of courts nationwide, including those in New Jersey, and to explore systemic causes for dissatisfaction or ineffectiveness among those in the pro se community as well as opportunities for innovative progress. The Advisory Group developed a set of recommendations that represent long-term strategies designed to enhance the public's experience using the New Jersey Court system while maintaining the Judiciary's integrity in the delivery of fair, impartial justice.
Each vicinage offers a dedicated customer service manager to help the public navigate the courts. The ombudsman assists litigants and other members of the public by explaining court procedures, programs and services; helping self-represented litigants; directing the public to appropriate offices and court staff; working with the various divisions to resolve customer complaints; referring customers to relevant social service or legal agencies; distributing brochures and informational material; and developing court tours and community education and outreach programs.
Webcasting of Supreme Court arguments began in January 2005 in order to provide the public, students, attorneys, reporters, and other interested viewers with the opportunity to watch the oral arguments live on the New Jersey Judiciary's web site njcourts.gov. A collaboration between Rutgers Law School and the New Jersey Judiciary made webcasts of New Jersey Supreme Court oral arguments permanently available on the Rutgers web site. At the end of 30 days the webcasts are transferred to the Rutgers Law School archives.
NJMCDirect allows drivers to view tickets online and pay penalties by credit card.
The Judiciary Electronic Filing and Imaging System (JEFIS) allows attorneys to file documents in special civil part cases and in foreclosure actions online.
The Ad Hoc Working Group on Pro Se Materials was formed in 1998 to address the demands placed upon the courts by the growing number of self-represented litigants. The work of the group focused on the creation of forms and brochures, and significant progress was made in the development of self-help forms frequently used in the civil, family, criminal, tax and appellate courts.
Composed of judges, lawyers, non-profit leaders and academics, the 27-member task force was appointed by the Supreme Court in June 1997. In focus groups and in its survey of judges, lawyers, litigants and witnesses, the task force found that most respondents do not believe discrimination based on sexual orientation is a pervasive problem in the New Jersey court system. The survey did indicate, however, that those who identified themselves as gay or lesbian reported problems to a greater degree than the overall population of respondents. It its final report, the task force made recommendations for ongoing education for judges and court employees, and communication to staff, litigants and their attorneys about how to report incidents of bias or discrimination.

The websites were developed to ensure Judiciary information and resources were made available to the public and court employees. The external site, njcourts.gov, has since gained national recognition for its comprehensiveness and social media usage

The Supreme Court constituted this committee to recommend to the chief justice goals, policies, practices and procedures to be followed by the Judiciary to comply with the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and related laws. Attention is given to training, communication, compliance, enforcement and review of procedures relating to the ADA and the needs of the elderly.

Since the early 1980s the Judiciary determined that “the same bias that has affected all of society for so long exists in all of its institutions, including the Judiciary." To ensure that fair and equitable access to the courts for racial and ethnic minority court users, judges and employees, the court designed and implemented a comprehensive action plan to "rid the court of all vestiges of bias and discrimination in the state court system." The Supreme Court Committee on Minority Concerns, with the collaboration of its local vicinages advisory committee on minority concerns monitors and reports on the progress made in implementing the system-wide recommendations and institutional enhancements.
"The New Jersey Judiciary is committed to the principles and goals of fairness, equality, courtesy and respect for all individuals." These principles are embodied in the Policy Statement on Equal Employment Opportunity, Affirmative Action and Anti-Discrimination and are reflected in the principles and policies that guide the activities and operations of the court system as an employer and as an arbiter of justice. The EEO/AA Master Plan spells out in detail these operational principles and guidelines; outcome measures are routinely reported to the court and the public.
In an effort to increase minority participation in the Law Clerk Program, the Judiciary, as a result of data collection by the Minority Concerns Committee, implemented this initiative to increase awareness in the program and actively recruit minorities into Law Clerk positions.
The Supreme Court adopted the principle of "equal access to courts for linguistic minorities" in 1985, acting on the recommendations of the Supreme Court Task Force on Interpreter and Translation Services. The Court reiterated its support for that principle in 1993 when it stated in its Action Plan on Minority Concerns that, "the courts and their support services shall be equally accessible for all persons regardless of the degree to which they are able to communicate effectively in the English language." Chief Justice Deborah T. Poritz
Since 1982, the Judiciary has monitored its progress in achieving gender fairness in the New Jersey Courts. Periodic surveys and focus groups guide the current Supreme Court Committee on Women in the Courts in its efforts to address ongoing issues through training and educational programs for judges, attorneys, courts staff and others.

|Top of Page|

Did you know?

  • There are a lot of interesting facts about the New Jersey Judiciary relating to access and fairness. This section includes a sample of data and factual highlights.
  • The New Jersey Judiciary's website, njcourts.gov, has won national and international awards? New Jersey was praised for "a great one-stop-shop for most court services in the state." The website, which has become an indispensable part of our operation, is a critical resource for the public to find court decisions, pay motor vehicle fines, learn about jobs and volunteer opportunities, download forms and instructions for litigants representing themselves in court, get information to request a court interpreter or an ADA accommodation and more.
  • That in 1995 the New Jersey Supreme Court constituted the Judiciary Advisory Committee on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Compliance? The committee recommends to the Chief Justice goals, policies, practices and procedures to be followed by the Judiciary to comply with the requirements of the ADA and related laws. There is an ADA Coordinator in every vicinage to assist the public with accommodations.
    Court Access for Persons with Disabilities
  • That in 2014 the New Jersey Judiciary recorded 831 Americans with Disabilities Act accommodations? This includes the municipal courts.
  • More than 70,000 interpreting events occur in New Jersey Superior Courts every year; that court interpreters are needed in more than 80 languages; and that New Jersey courts provide court interpreting services free of charge?
    New Jersey Judiciary Language Access Plan
    Court Interpreting Statistics
  • There is a Judiciary Ombudsman in every vicinage? These dedicated customer service managers provide one-on-one specialized services to court users, work with the community to promote public trust and confidence in the courts and make recommendations to improve court services. Many ombudsmen regularly hold public workshops/seminars on topics such as foreclosure, landlord/tenant, child support and custody, divorce, and expungements.
    Ombudsman Program
    Calendar of Court Seminars and Public Events
  • The New Jersey Judiciary has 12 self-help centers to assist self-represented litigants in their court matters? Anyone can visit these centers regardless of where their case is filed or where they reside. The centers are located in the Atlantic, Bergen, Camden, Cape May, Essex, Hudson, Mercer, Monmouth, Morris, Ocean, Sussex, and Union County courthouses. For more information contact the ombudsman in those counties.
    Ombudsman Program
  • The New Jersey Judiciary is committed to the principles and goals of fairness, equality, courtesy and respect for all individuals? These principles are embodied in the Policy Statement on Equal Employment Opportunity, Affirmative Action and Anti-Discrimination and are reflected in the principles and policies that guide the activities and operations of the court system as an employer and as an arbiter of justice. The EEO/AA Master Plan spells out in detail these operational principles and guidelines; outcome measures are routinely reported to the court and the public.
    Judiciary Policy Statement on EEO/AA and Anti-Discrimination
    EEO Judiciary Master Plan
  • That the Supreme Court Committee on Minority Concerns is tasked with assisting and advising the Supreme Court with the implementation of court-approved recommendations designed to "rid the court of all vestiges of bias and discrimination?" The New Jersey Judiciary has realized numerous advances through the efforts of the Minority Concerns Program. One example of such change is seen in the increased representation of racial/ethnic minorities on the bench and in senior management.

MID-1980s

CURRENT

JUDGES* (Supreme Court and Superior Court-Appellate and Trial Divisions)

Minority Judges/

4.3%

17.8%

Women Judges

7.1%

35.0%

SENIOR MANAGEMENT POSITIONS**

Racial/Ethnic Minorities in Senior Management Positions

8.3%

27.9%


* January 2017 – includes Supreme, Appellate, Tax, and Superior Courts
** January 2017 – includes Court Executives 3a, 3b, and 4 combined statewide
Supreme Court Committee on Minority Concerns


|Top of Page|

Supreme Court Advisory Committee on Access and Fairness
Portada del Español

Comité de Asesoramiento de la Corte Suprema sobre el Acceso y la Imparcialidad

RJH Justice Complex , 25 W. Market St., PO Box 037, Trenton, NJ 08625-0037
El Honorable Juez Glenn A. Grant, Presidente
Janie Rodriguez, Asistente

Acerca del Comité de Asesoramiento de la Corte Suprema sobre el Acceso y la Imparcialidad

Para asegurar que el Poder Judicial, como institución, incluya el acceso y la imparcialidad como parte integral de sus valores esenciales, el Juez Presidente de la Corte Suprema Stuart Rabner creó el Comité de Asesoramiento de la Corte Suprema sobre el Acceso y la Imparcialidad. El trabajo del comité ayudará a establecer las pautas para el funcionamiento del Poder Judicial durante el próximo cuarto de siglo y más allá.

El comité consta de jueces, personal del Poder Judicial y miembros de varias organizaciones públicas. Los miembros son diversos, con talento de la magistratura, de los administradores de las vecindades, del liderazgo de la oficina central y de otros, tales como los colegios de abogados, los Servicios Legales de Nueva Jersey, y la Asociación de Alguaciles de Nueva Jersey.

El comité está creando una campaña por todo el estado para enfocarse en cómo administrar la justicia en vista de desafíos tales como el constante aumento en el número de litigantes que se representan a sí mismos, las presiones económicas ejercidas sobre los litigantes y los tribunales, y la necesidad de tratar cada caso y a cada litigante con dignidad y respeto.

¿Por qué es esto importante?

Los millones de litigantes que acuden a los tribunales cada año para obtener una resolución justa de sus casos deben tener la certeza de que son tratados equitativamente, bien sea con abogados o sin ellos. Deben tener un acceso pleno a los tribunales, independientemente de sus ingresos, barreras lingüísticas, discapacidad, diversidad cultural o nivel de estudios.
El Poder Judicial se guía por sus cuatro valores fundamentales: la independencia, la integridad, la imparcialidad y el servicio de calidad. El acceso y la imparcialidad son las bases de dichos valores y determinan la experiencia de cada uno de los litigantes. La imparcialidad no se puede lograr sin el acceso a los tribunales: el componente más importante del servicio de calidad.

|Top of Page|

Sin lugar a dudas, el Poder Judicial de Nueva Jersey ha logrado incorporar en gran medida sus valores fundamentales a las labores diarias. El Poder Judicial ha creado un enfoque integrado y coordinado para la solución de problemas mediante consultas, comités, una capacitación amplificada y la comunicación con el personal y el público. Pero a medida que el Poder Judicial avanza, debe poner un énfasis nuevo y mayor en el acceso a los tribunales y la imparcialidad de sus procedimientos.
Algunos de los éxitos del Poder Judicial incluyen:

A través del liderazgo del Juez Presidente de la Corte Suprema de Nueva Jersey Stuart Rabner, los tres poderes del gobierno estatal trabajaron juntos para reformar el sistema de justicia penal, lo cual requirió una enmienda constitucional, la promulgación de la ley de reforma de la fianza y del juicio a la mayor brevedad, y ciertas revisiones al reglamento judicial. Nueva Jersey ha avanzado ahora desde un sistema que se basaba principalmente en fijar una fianza monetaria como una condición para poner en libertad provisional a un acusado hasta un sistema basado en riesgo--que es más objetivo y por lo tanto más justo porque no está relacionado con su capacidad para pagar una fianza monetaria. Un sistema basado en riesgo promueve la seguridad de la comunidad y también considera si el acusado comparecerá en el tribunal en el futuro y si es probable que obstruya el proceso de justicia penal.
La aplicación NJMC permite que los usuarios paguen las multas de tráfico directamente a través de NJMCdirect, busquen información sobre los juzgados municipales del estado, y accedan a la publicación “Su Día en el Juzgado Municipal”, la cual responde las preguntas más frecuentes sobre el modo en que un caso típico procede en un juzgado municipal.
Esta aplicación enlaza con la información que los abogados usan con mayor frecuencia, que incluye los Avisos al Colegio de Abogados, indicaciones e información sobre los contactos en los tribunales, el reglamento judicial y las reglas sobre los medios de prueba.
La aplicación NJJuror ofrece a los jurados un acceso cómodo a la información sobre el servicio de jurado, la cual incluye las indicaciones, información sobre el estacionamiento, los mensajes de cancelación y anuncios, y la información de contacto para los administradores locales del jurado. También disponibles están las respuestas a preguntas frecuentes y un enlace con “Usted, el Jurado” –un video introductorio que todos los jurados tienen que mirar al comienzo de su servicio como jurado.
El Juez Presidente de la Corte Suprema de Nueva Jersey Stuart Rabner estableció el Comité Asesor de la Corte Suprema sobre el Acceso y la Imparcialidad ("el Comité”) para guiar al poder judicial a adaptarse a las exigencias actuales y futuras de los tribunales. El comité se enfoca en el mejor modo de administrar la justicia ante desafíos tales como el aumento continuo en el número de litigantes que se representan a sí mismos, la creciente población multicultural en Nueva Jersey, la necesidad de ampliar los servicios lingüísticos, las presiones económicas sobre los litigantes y los tribunales, y la necesidad de asegurar un servicio de calidad y de tratar cada causa y a cada litigante con dignidad y respeto.
El Grupo Asesor sobre la Auto-representación en los Tribunales de Nueva Jersey (Grupo Asesor) se estableció para evaluar los programas, las políticas y los procedimientos que tienen éxito en los tribunales por todo el país, incluidos aquellos en Nueva Jersey, y para explorar las causas sistemáticas del descontento o inefectividad entre aquellos de la comunidad pro se, así como las oportunidades para lograr un progreso innovador. El Grupo Asesor creó un conjunto de recomendaciones que representan estrategias a largo plazo concebidas para mejorar la experiencia del público en el uso del sistema Judicial de Nueva Jersey y que al mismo tiempo mantienen la integridad del Poder Judicial cuando imparte una justicia equitativa e imparcial.
Cada vecindad ofrece un administrador de servicios al cliente dedicado a ayudar al público para guiarlo por los tribunales. El defensor del pueblo ayuda a los litigantes y a otros miembros del público explicándoles los procedimientos del tribunal, los programas y servicios; ayudando a los litigantes que se representan a sí mismos; dando instrucciones al público sobre las oficinas y las personas apropiadas; trabajando con varias divisiones para resolver las quejas de los clientes; dirigiendo a los clientes a los servicios sociales o a las agencias legales pertinentes; distribuyendo folletos y material informativo; y promoviendo visitas a los tribunales y programas para instruir y establecer vínculos con la comunidad.
Las transmisiones vía Internet de los alegatos ante la Corte Suprema comenzaron en enero de 2005 para brindar al público, a los estudiantes, abogados, periodistas y otros interesados la oportunidad de observar los alegatos orales en vivo en el sitio web del Poder Judicial de Nueva Jersey, njcourts.gov. La colaboración entre la facultad de derecho de Rutgers en Newark (Rutgers School of Law-Newark) y el Poder Judicial de Nueva Jersey ha hecho posible que las transmisiones de los alegatos orales de la Corte Suprema de Nueva Jersey estén disponibles de manera permanente en el sitio web de Rutgers. Después de 30 días, las transmisiones se transfieren a los archivos de la escuela de derecho de Rutgers en Newark.
NJMCDirect permite que los conductores vean sus multas en línea y paguen las penalidades con una tarjeta de crédito.
El Sistema del Poder Judicial de Presentación Electrónica y Escaneo (JEFIS) permite que los abogados presenten en línea sus documentos en los casos de la parte civil especial y en acciones de ejecución hipotecaria.
El Grupo de Trabajo Ad Hoc sobre Materiales para la Auto-representación (Pro Se) se formó en 1998 para abordar las exigencias impuestas sobre los tribunales por el número creciente de litigantes que se representan a sí mismos. La tarea del grupo se centró en la creación de formularios y folletos, y se hizo un progreso significativo en el desarrollo de los formularios de autoayuda que se utilizan con frecuencia en los tribunales civiles, los de familia, los penales, los de asuntos tributarios y los de apelación.
Compuesto por jueces, abogados, líderes que trabajan sin fines de lucro y académicos, la Corte Suprema nombró un equipo de trabajo de 27 miembros en junio de 1997. En grupos de discusión y en su encuesta a jueces, abogados, litigantes y testigos, el grupo de trabajo determinó que la mayoría de los encuestados no creían que la discriminación basada en la orientación sexual fuera un problema dominante en el sistema judicial de Nueva Jersey. Sin embargo, la encuesta sí indicó que aquellos que se identificaban como homosexuales informaban problemas en un grado mayor que la población general de encuestados. En su informe final, el grupo de trabajo hizo recomendaciones para que regularmente se ofrezca instrucción a los jueces y a los empleados judiciales, y comunicación al personal, a los litigantes y a sus abogados sobre cómo comunicar los incidentes de parcialidad o discriminación.

Los sitios web se concibieron para asegurar que la información y los recursos del Poder Judicial estén a la disposición del público y de los empleados del tribunal. El sitio externo, njcourts.gov, ha ganado desde su incepción un reconocimiento nacional por su cabalidad y su uso en las redes sociales.

La Corte Suprema constituyó este comité para recomendar al juez presidente las metas, los principios, las prácticas y los procedimientos que debe seguir el Poder Judicial para cumplir con los requisitos de la Ley de Estadounidenses con Discapacidades (ADA) y las leyes relacionadas. Se presta una atención especial a la capacitación, la comunicación, el cumplimiento, la ejecución y la revisión de los procedimientos relacionados con la ley ADA y las necesidades de los de la tercera edad.

Desde comienzos de la década del 80, el Poder Judicial determinó que “el mismo prejuicio que ha afectado a toda la sociedad durante tanto tiempo existe en todas sus instituciones, incluso en el Poder Judicial”. Para asegurar un acceso justo y equitativo a los usuarios de los tribunales a los jueces y a los empleados, que pertenecen a minorías étnicas y raciales, el tribunal diseñó e implementó un plan de acción detallado para “eliminar del tribunal todo vestigio de prejuicio y discriminación en el sistema judicial del estado”. El Comité de la Corte Suprema sobre Asuntos Relacionados con Minorías, con la colaboración de sus comités de asesoramiento de las vecindades locales, vigila y comunica el progreso realizado en la ejecución de las recomendaciones por todo el sistema y las mejoras institucionales
"“El Poder Judicial de Nueva Jersey se compromete a los principios y las metas de imparcialidad, igualdad, cortesía y respeto para todos los individuos”. Estos principios fundamentales se incorporan en la Declaración de Principios sobre la Igualdad de Oportunidades de Empleo (EEO), Acción Afirmativa (AA) y Antidiscriminación, y se reflejan en los principios y propósitos que guían las actividades y las operaciones del sistema judicial como patrón y como árbitro de la justicia. El Plan Maestro de la EEO/AA explica detalladamente dichas pautas y principios operativos; las medidas de los resultados se informan sistemáticamente a la Corte y al público.
En un esfuerzo para aumentar la participación de las minorías en el Programa de Abogados Pasantes, el Poder Judicial, como consecuencia de la recopilación de datos obtenidos por el Comité de Asuntos relacionados con las Minorías, implementó esta iniciativa para que el programa sea más conocido y de manera activa se contraten a personas que pertenecen a las minorías para los puestos de Abogados Pasantes.
La Corte Suprema adoptó el principio de "igualdad de acceso a los tribunales para las minorías lingüísticas" en 1985, en respuesta a las recomendaciones del Grupo de Trabajo de la Corte Suprema sobre los Servicios de Interpretación y Traducción. La Corte reiteró su apoyo a ese principio en 1993 cuando manifestó en su Plan de Acción sobre Asuntos de Minorías que "los tribunales y sus servicios de apoyo deben ser accesibles de igual manera para todas las personas, independientemente del nivel al cual puedan comunicarse de manera eficaz en el idioma inglés". La Honorable Juez Presidente de la Corte Suprema Deborah T. Poritz
Desde 1982, el Poder Judicial ha seguido de cerca su progreso para lograr una imparcialidad de género en los Tribunales de Nueva Jersey. Las encuestas periódicas y los grupos de discusión ayudan al actual Comité de la Corte Suprema sobre las Mujeres en los Tribunales en sus esfuerzos para abordar las cuestiones constantes mediante los programas educativos y de capacitación para jueces, abogados, personal de los tribunales y otros.

|Top of Page|

¿Sabía usted que

  • hay una gran cantidad de hechos interesantes acerca del Poder Judicial de Nueva Jersey relacionados con el acceso y la imparcialidad? Esta sección incluye una muestra de datos y hechos sobresalientes.
  • la página del Poder Judicial de Nueva Jersey, njcourts.gov, ganó premios nacionales e internacionales en los años 2003 y 2008? Se elogió la página de Nueva Jersey por ser “un gran modo de tener un solo lugar para encontrar la mayoría de los servicios judiciales en el estado”. Esta página en la red, que se ha convertido en una parte indispensable de nuestra operación, es un recurso crítico para que el público encuentre decisiones judiciales, pague multas por infracciones de vehículos motorizados, se entere de oportunidades de empleo y de servicios voluntarios, baje los formularios e instrucciones que son usados por los litigantes que se representan a sí mismos ante los tribunales, obtenga información para solicitar un intérprete judicial o un arreglo especial por discapacidad según ADA, y más.
  • en el año 1995 la Corte Suprema constituyó el Comité Judicial de Asesoramiento sobre el Cumplimiento con la Ley para Discapacitados (ADA)? El comité le recomienda al Juez Presidente las metas, propósitos, prácticas y procedimientos que el Poder Judicial ha de seguir para cumplir con los requisitos de la ley ADA y las leyes relacionadas. Hay un Coordinador de ADA en cada vecindad para ayudar al público con los arreglos especiales.
    Acceso a los Tribunales para las Personas con Discapacidades (en inglés)
  • en el año 2014 el Poder Judicial de Nueva Jersey registró 831 arreglos según la ley para los estadounidenses con discapacidades? Esto incluye los juzgados municipales.
  • cada año ocurren más de 70,000 actos procesales en los Tribunales Superiores de Nueva Jersey para los cuales se necesitan intérpretes judiciales en más de 80 idiomas, y que los tribunales de Nueva Jersey proporcionan los servicios de interpretación judicial sin costo?
    Plan de Acceso a Idiomas del Poder Judicial de Nueva Jersey (en inglés)
    Estadísticas sobre la Interpretación Judicial (en inglés)
  • hay un Defensor del Pueblo del Poder Judicial en cada vecindad? Estos administradores dedicados al servicio a los clientes proporcionan servicios especializados sobre una base personal a los usuarios de los tribunales, trabajan con la comunidad para promover la seguridad y confianza del público en los tribunales y hacen recomendaciones para mejorar los servicios judiciales. Muchos defensores del pueblo ofrecen con frecuencia talleres y seminarios públicos sobre temas tales como la ejecución hipotecaria, las relaciones entre propietarios e inquilinos, la manutención y custodia de menores, el divorcio y la erradicación de condenas.
    Programa del Defensor del Pueblo (en inglés)
    Programa de Seminarios Judiciales y Eventos Públicos (en inglés)
  • el Poder Judicial de Nueva Jersey tiene doce centros de autoayuda para los litigantes que se representan a sí mismos en sus asuntos judiciales? Cualquier persona puede visitar estos centros sin que importe dónde se ha presentado su caso o dónde la persona reside. Los centros están ubicados en los palacios de justicia de los condados de Atlantic, Bergen, Camden, Cape May, Essex, Hudson, Mercer, Monmouth, Morris, Ocean, Sussex, y Union. Para obtener más información, comuníquese con el defensor del pueblo en esos condados.
    Programa del Defensor del Pueblo (en inglés)
  • el Poder Judicial de Nueva Jersey se ha comprometido a los principios y metas de equidad, igualdad, cortesía y respeto para todos los individuos? Estos principios están incorporados en la Declaración de Propósito sobre la Igualdad de Oportunidad de empleo, Acción Afirmativa y Antidiscriminación y se reflejan en los principios y propósitos que guían las actividades y operaciones del sistema judicial como patrono y como árbitro de la justicia. El Plan Maestro de EEO/AA expresa detalladamente estos principios y pautas de operación; la medición de los resultados se comunica sistemáticamente a los tribunales y al público.
    Declaración de Principios del Poder Judicial sobre la EEO/AA y la Antidiscriminación (en inglés)
    Plan Maestro EEO del Poder Judicial (en inglés)
  • el Comité de la Corte Suprema sobre los Asuntos de las Minorías tiene la tarea de ayudar y asesorar a la Corte Suprema para llevar a cabo las recomendaciones aprobadas por la Corte que se han concebido con el fin de “eliminar de los tribunales todo vestigio de parcialidad y discriminación”? El Poder Judicial de Nueva Jersey ha realizado avances numerosos mediante los esfuerzos del Programa sobre los Asuntos Relacionados con las Minorías. Un ejemplo de tal cambio se ve en el aumento de la representación de minorías raciales y étnicas en la magistratura y en los equipos directivos.

A mediados del decenio de 1980

ACTUALMENTE

JUECES* (Corte Suprema y las Divisiones de Apelación y de Primera Instancia)

Jueces Minoritarios:

4.3%

17.8%

Jueces Mujeres:

7.1%

35.0%

POSICIONES DE ALTO RANGO**

Minorías raciales/étnicas en equipos directivos

8.3%

27.9%


* enero de2017 – incluye la Corte Suprema, los Tribunales Superiores, de Apelación y de Asuntos Tributarios
** enero de2017 – incluye los ejecutivos de los tribunales 3a, 3b, y 4 combinados por todo el estado
Comité de la Corte Suprema sobre Asuntos Relacionados con Minorías


|Top of Page|